SMI 2022 website is open, paper submission deadline on March 15th, 2021.

About SMI

Shape Modeling International (SMI 2021) provides an international forum for the dissemination of new mathematical theories and computational techniques for modeling, simulating and processing digital representations of shapes and their properties to a community of researchers, developers, students, and practitioners across a wide range of fields. Conference proceedings (long and short papers) will be published in a Special Issue of Computer & Graphics Journal, Elsevier. Papers presenting original research are being sought in all areas of shape modeling and its applications.

More information on topics, submission guidelines, and important dates are given below.

Co-located event

SMI 2021 will be an online conference in 2021.

The Fabrication and Sculpting Event FASE (2021) will be organized in co-location with SMI 2021. It presents original research at the intersection of theory and practice in shape modeling, fabrication and sculpting.

When and Where

The symposium will take place from November 13th to 16th online. The day before we will have a workshop.

SMI21: Submitting a Paper

IMPORTANT DATES

Full paper submission: Wednesday, June 30th, 2021
First review notification: Wednesday, July 28th Sunday, Aug 1st, 2021
Revised papers: Wednesday, September 15th, 2021
Second review notification: Wednesday, October 6th, 2021
Camera ready full papers due: Wednesday, October 20th, 2021
Conference: Sunday-Tuesday, November 14th-16th, 2021

Topics

  • Acquisition and reconstruction
  • Behavior and animation models
  • Compression and streaming
  • Computational topology
  • Correspondence and registration
  • Curves and surfaces
  • Deep Learning Techniques for Shape Processing
  • Digital fabrication and 3D printing
  • Exploration of shape collections
  • Feature extraction and classification
  • Healing and resampling
  • Implicit surfaces
  • Interactive modeling, design and editing
  • Medial and skeletal representations
  • Parametric and procedural models
  • Segmentation
  • Semantics of shapes
  • Shape analysis and retrieval
  • Shape correspondence and retrieval
  • Shape modeling applications (biomedical, GIS, artistic, cultural heritage and others)
  • Shape statistics
  • Shape transformation, bending and deformation
  • Simulation
  • Sketching and 3D input modalities
  • Triangle and polygonal meshes
  • Shape modelling for 3D printing and fabrication
  • Biomedical applications
  • Artistic and cultural applications

Submission

Papers should present previously unpublished, original results that are not simultaneously submitted elsewhere.

Submissions should be formatted according to the style guidelines for the Computers &Graphics Journal and should not exceed 12 pages, including figures and references. We strongly recommend using the LaTeX template to format your paper. We also accept papers formatted by MS Word according to the style guidelines for Computers & Graphics. The file must be exported to pdf file for the first round of submission. For format details, please refer to Computers & Graphics Guide for Authors.

The SMI 2021 conference will use a double-blind review process. Consequently, all submissions must be anonymous. All papers should be submitted directly via the journal online submission system of Computers & Graphics (click here). When submitting your paper to SMI 2021, please make sure that the type of article is specified as "VSI:SMI 2021”. Any accepted paper is required to have at least one registered author to attend and present the paper at the conference. To register go to the registration link .

Register here!

Subdivision History Day: Sunday, November 14th, 2021

Shape Modeling International (SMI 2021) will have a workshop/panel that is called "Subdivision History Day" The goal is not only to discuss important milestones but also to introduce the human element behind the discoveries. Participants will tell us anecdotes providing insights behind the discoveries. We hope that a science historian or a popular science writer (or a few of us) can turn the collected information first into an article and later into a book. The article can potentially be published in Computers & Graphics. If this event becomes successful, we can also extend it to other fields in computer graphics or shape modeling.

More information will be provided soon.

Call For Nominations:
Tosiyasu Kunii Award

Shape Modeling International Awards Committee is seeking proposals to nominate the shape modeling researchers with distinguished careers for the Tosiyasu Kunii Award. The recipients of the award will be selected by the SMI Awards Committee, based on proposals from the research community in Shape Modeling. The proposals can simply be in a formal letter format. Self-nominations will also be considered. The nomination letters should provide a clear description of the substantial contributions of the candidate into the field of shape modeling. Nomination proposals can be accepted by the SMI awards committee at any time. The decision will be announced two months before the conference. The Awards are presented at the Shape Modeling Conference and the award recipients are invited to give a keynote speech at Shape Modeling Conference. There will also be interviews with the recipients. The proposers will normally be responsible for the interviews, which will be published in the proceedings. Please send your nominations to the chair of award commiteee, Brian Wyvill: brianwyvill at gmail dot com, before September 5th, 2021. The award committee will announce the winner on Sept, 17th, 2021.

Award recipient: BIANCA FALCIDIENO

Call For Nominations:
SMI Young Investigator Award

Shape Modeling International Awards Committee is seeking proposals to nominate young researchers' significant contributions to shape modeling for the Shape Modeling International Young Researcher Award. Candidates must have received their Ph.D. degrees at most seven years ago. The recipients of the award will be selected by the SMI Awards Committee, based on proposals from the research community in Shape Modeling. The proposals can simply be in a formal letter format. Self-nominations will also be considered. The nomination letters should provide a clear description of the substantial contributions of the candidate into the field of shape modeling. Nomination proposals can be accepted by the SMI awards committee at any time. The decision will be announced two months before the conference. The Awards are presented at the Shape Modeling Conference and the award recipients are invited to give a keynote speech at the Shape Modeling Conference. There will also be interviews with the recipients. The proposers will normally be responsible for the interviews, which will be published in the proceedings. Please send your nominations to the chair of award commiteee, Brian Wyvill: brianwyvill at gmail dot com, before September 5th, 2021. The award committee will announce the winner on Sept, 17th, 2021.

Award recipient: MÉLINA SKOURAS

Replicability Stamp (Tentative)

SMI participates in the Replicability Stamp Initiative, an additional recognition for authors who are willing to go one step further, and in addition to publishing the paper, provide a complete open-source implementation. The Graphics Replicability Stamp Initiative (GRSI) is an independent group of volunteers who want to help the community by enabling sharing of code and data as a community resource for non-commercial use. The volunteers review the submitted code and certify its replicability, awarding a replicability stamp, which is an additional recognition for authors of accepted papers who are willing to provide a complete implementation of their algorithm, to replicate the results presented in their paper. The replicability stamp is not meant to be a measure of the scientific quality of the paper or of the usefulness of presented algorithms. Rather, it is meant to be an endorsement of the replicability of the results presented in it!

The paper and the recognition of the service provided to the community by releasing the code. Submissions for the replicability stamp will be considered only after the paper has been fully accepted. Submissions that are awarded the replicability stamp will receive additional exposure by being listed on this website. The purpose of this stamp is to promote reproducibility of research results and to allow scientists and practitioners to immediately benefit from state-of-the-art research results, without spending months re-implementing the proposed algorithms and trying to find the right parameter values. We also hope that it will indirectly foster scientific progress, since it will allow researchers to reliably compare with and to build upon existing techniques, knowing that they are using exactly the same implementation. This is an initiative supported by a growing list of publishers, journals, and conferences.

The submission procedure is lightweight (click here to see requirements) and we encourage the authors of accepted papers to participate by filling the form that they received in the acceptance letter. The papers with the replicability stamp will receive additional exposure during SMI, and will be listed on the replicability stamp website.

The qualified papers will be decorated with the logo in the program.
(logo design by Michela Mortara)

Registration

  • Full Registration: $100
  • ACM/Eurographics/IEEE Members: $50
  • Students: $10
  • Registration fee is waived for Keynote Speakers, Subdivision Day Contributors, and Student Volunteers. Please register by choosing waived.

To register, go to the registration link. After registration, you will receive the confirmation email sent from sdunn at arch.tamu.edu in a few minutes. Please check your junk email folder just in case the confirmation email got delivered there. Please contact Ergun Akleman if you need official letters.

Register here!

Program (Nov. 14th, 15th, 16th)

We use 24-HOUR CLOCK format

SUNDAY, NOV. 14TH, SUBDIVISION HISTORY DAY
10:30-11:00 (New York)
16:30-17:00 (Rome)
23:30-24:00 (Beijing)
Opening
11:00-11:50 (New York)
17:00-17:50 (Rome)
24:00-00:50 (Beijing - Next Day)
Panel: Early days of Subdivision
Chair: Ergun Akleman
Panelists: Ed Catmull, Elaine Cohen, Tony DeRose, Jeff Lane, Richard Riesenfeld, Malcolm Sabin
12:00-12:50 (New York)
18:00-18:50 (Rome)
01:00-01:50 (Beijing - Next day)
Panel: Subdivision Becomes Mainstream in Graphics
Chair: Malcolm Sabin
Panelists: Ed Catmull, Nira Dyn, Tony DeRose, David Levin, Charles Loop, Jan Pinkava, Jörg Peters, Ulrich Reif, Jos Stam
13:00-13:50 (New York)
19:00-19:50 (Rome)
02:00-02:50 (Beijing - Next day)
Panel: Beyond
Chair: Jörg Peters
Panelists: Ergun Akleman, Leif Kobbelt, Ahmad Nasri, Peter Schröder, Luiz Velho, Joe Warren, Denis Zorin
MONDAY, NOV. 15TH
08:00-08:45 (New York)
14:00-14:45 (Rome)
21:00-21:45 (Beijing)
Keynote: Data-Driven 3D Modeling
Speaker: Siddhartha Chaudhuri
Chair: Yang Liu
08:45-09:45 (New York)
14:45-15:45 (Rome)
21:45-22:45 (Beijing)
Session I: Modeling & Reconstruction
Chair: Gershon Elber

Real-time Skeletonization for Sketch-based Modeling [link] [code]
Jing Ma, Jin Wang, Jituo Li, Dongliang Zhang

Accurate Floorplan Reconstruction Using Geometric Priors [link]
Ruifan Cai, Honglin Li, Jun Xie, Xiaogang Jin

Enhanced Narrow Band Surface Reconstruction with Anisotropic Kernel [link]
Qiaorui Chen, Shuai Zhang, Yao Zheng
09:45-10:00 (New York)
15:45-16:00 (Rome)
22:45-23:00 (Beijing)

Virtual Roundtable Discussion
A few zoom breakout rooms will be created for online discussion. Please participate and share your opinions. The suggested discussion topics are listed here.

10:00-10:45 (New York)
16:00-16:45 (Rome)
23:00-23:45 (Beijing)
Award Talk: On the Computational Design of Deformable Objects
Speaker: Mélina Skouras
Chair: Bo Zhu
10:45-11:45 (New York)
16:45-17:45 (Rome)
23:45-00:45 (Beijing - Next day)
Session II: Learning-based Reconstruction
Chair: Ramanathan Muthuganapathy

Learning Modified Indicator Functions for Surface Reconstruction [link]
Dong Xiao, Siyou Lin, Zuoqiang Shi, Bin Wang

Learning Persistent Homology of 3D Point Clouds [link]
Chi Zhou, Zhetong Dong, Hongwei Lin

Unsupervised Recursive Deep Fitting 3D Primitives to Points [link]
Tsahi Saporta, Andrei Sharf
11:45-12:00 (New York)
17:45-18:00 (Rome)
00:45-01:00 (Beijing - Next day)
Virtual Roundtable Discussion
A few zoom breakout rooms will be created for online discussion. Please participate and share your opinions. The suggested discussion topics are listed here.
12:00-12:15 (New York)
18:00-18:15 (Rome)
01:00-01:15 (Beijing - Next day)
Virtual Award Ceremony
Chair: Brian Wyvill
12:15-13:15 (New York)
18:15-19:15 (Rome)
01:15-02:15 (Beijing - Next day)
Session III: Registration & Animation
Chair: Jos Stam

Hierarchical Mesh-to-points As-rigid-as-possible Registration [link]
Pierre Bourquat, Guillaume Damiand, David Coeurjolly, Florent Dupont

As-rigid-as-possible Volume tracking for Time-varying Surfaces [link]
Jan Dvořák, Zuzana Káčereková, Petr Vaněček, Lukáš Hruda, Libor Vasa

Automatic Shape Adjustment at Joints for the Implicit Skinning [link]
Olivier Hachette, Florian Canezin, Rodolphe Vaillant, Nicolas Mellado, Loïc Barthe
13:15-13:30 (New York)
19:15-19:30 (Rome)
02:15-02:30 (Beijing - Next day)
Virtual Roundtable Discussion
A few zoom breakout rooms will be created for online discussion. Please participate and share your opinions. The suggested discussion topics are listed here.
TUESDAY, NOV. 16TH
08:00-08:30 (New York)
14:00-14:30 (Rome)
21:00-21:30 (Beijing)
Award Talk: Shape Modeling: from Geometry to Semantics
Speaker: Bianca Falcidieno
Chair: Jorg Peters
08:30-09:30 (New York)
14:30-15:30 (Rome)
21:30-22:30 (Beijing)
Session IV: Synthesis and Surfaces
Chair: Myung-Soo Kim

Synthesis of 3D Jigsaw Puzzles over Freeform 2-Manifolds [link]
Gershon Elber, Myung-Soo Kim

A Multigrid Approach for Harmonic Measured Foliations [link]
Shaodong Wang, Shuai Ma, Hui Zhao, Wencheng Wang

Projection-based Classification of Surfaces for 3D Human Mesh Sequence Retrieval [link]
Emery Pierson, Juan-Carlos Alvarez-Paiva, Mohamed Daoudi
09:30-09:45 (New York)
15:30-15:45 (Rome)
22:30-22:45 (Beijing)
Virtual Roundtable Discussion
A few zoom breakout rooms will be created for online discussion. Please participate and share your opinions. The suggested discussion topics are listed here.
09:45-10:30 (New York)
15:45-16:30 (Rome)
22:45-23:30 (Beijing)
Keynote: Computational Geometry for Morphing Matter Design
Speaker: Lining Yao
Chair: Silvia Biasotti
10:30-11:10 (New York)
16:30-17:10 (Rome)
23:30-00:10 (Beijing - Next day)
Session V: Reconstruction & Representation
Chair: Georges-Pierre Bonneau

Extracting Datums to Reconstruct CSG Models from 2D Engineering Sketches of Polyhedral Shapes [link]
Raquel Plumed, Peter Ashley, Clifford Varley, Pedro Company, Ralph Martin

An Improved Refinement Rule for Multi-sided Faces [link]
Kestutis Karciauskas, Jörg Peters
11:10-13:10 (New York)
17:10-19:10 (Rome)
00:10-02:10 (Beijing - Next day)
FASE Paper Session
Chair: Oleg Fryazinov

Shell-Lattice Construction based on Regular and Semi-regular Tiling via Functional Composition
Sumita Dahiya, Avi Shein, Gershon Elber

Dithering by Wires of Orthogonal Images
Firas Habib, Sagit Asman, Gershon Elber

Positive Genus Space-Filling Tiles (short paper)
Ergun Akleman, Vinayak Krishnamurthy, Chia-An Fu, Courtney Starrett, Sai Ganesh Subramanian, Doyeon Kim, Nicholas Cropper, Mathew Ebert

Construction of Planar and Symmetric Truss Structures with Interlocking Edge Elements (short paper)
Anantha Natarajan, Jiaqi Cui, Ergun Akleman, Vinayak Krishnamurthy

3D Gosper Sculptures
Carlo H. Séquin

13:10-13:25 (New York)
19:10-19:25 (Rome)
02:10-02:25 (Beijing)
Virtual Roundtable Discussion
A few zoom breakout rooms will be created for online discussion. Please participate and share your opinions. The suggested discussion topics are listed here.
13:25-13:55 (New York)
19:25-19:55 (Rome)
02:25-02:55 (Beijing - Next day)
Best paper awards & Ending
Chair:: Ergun Akleman
Suggested topics for virtual roundtable discussion: pros and cons of 3D learning for 3D reconstruction, next big thing in 3D fabrication/manufacture, future of implicit Surfaces, modeling with high dimensional-manifolds, curves and surfaces, applications, shape similarity reasoning, and challenges in shape modeling and reconstruction.

Keynote Speakers

Name

Siddhartha Chaudhuri

Adobe Research and IIT Bombay, India

Bio: Siddhartha Chaudhuri is a Senior Research Scientist in the Creative Intelligence Lab at Adobe Research, and an Assistant Professor (on extended leave) of Computer Science and Engineering at IIT Bombay. He obtained his Ph.D. from Stanford University, and his undergraduate degree from IIT Kanpur. He subsequently did postdoctoral research at Stanford and Princeton, and taught at Cornell. Siddhartha's work combines geometric analysis, machine learning, and UI innovation to make sophisticated 3D geometric modeling accessible even to non-expert users. He also studies foundational problems in geometry processing (retrieval, segmentation, correspondences) that arise from this pursuit. His research themes include assembly-based modeling, semantic attributes for design, generative neural networks for shapes, and other applications of deep learning to 3D geometry processing. He is the original author of the commercial 3D character modeling tool Adobe Fuse, and the author of the open-source Thea toolkit for geometric computing.

Data-Driven 3D Modeling

Date: 15th Nov, 08:00-08:45 am (EST)

Abstract: For this keynote, I have chosen a “broad” topic rather than a “focused” one. I will describe foundational challenges in 3D interactive modeling, and discuss why classical hand-designed techniques and interfaces do not always satisfactorily address them. I will then present ways in which the research community in general, a nd my colleagues and I in particular, have attempted to train algorithms on large repositories of data in order to better capture design principles and intent that are relevant to human modelers. Since the context is interactive modeling, I will chiefly discuss generative or quasi-generative methods. The talk will span about a decade of work in machine learning as applied to 3D modeling, outline exciting new work that is happening right now, and conjecture where the field might head next.


 
Name

Lining Yao

Carnegie Mellon University, USA

Bio: Lining Yao is an Assistant Professor of Human-Computer Interaction Institute at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU), School of Computer Science, directing the Morphing Matter Lab. Lining also holds courtesy appointments at Mechanical Engineering and Material Sciences and Engineering at CMU. Morphing Matter lab develops processes, materials, tools, and applications of adaptive, dynamic, and intelligent morphing matter from nano to macro scales. Research often combines material science, computational fabrication, and creative design practices. The mission is to advance both science and society with the design of morphing matter. Lining and her lab work anti-disciplinarily, publishing and exhibiting across science, engineering, design, and art. Lining gained her Ph.D. from the MIT Media Lab. She is a Wired UK fellow, CMU Provost's Inclusive Teaching Fellow, and a recipient of the NSF CAREER Award.

Computational Geometry for Morphing Matter Design

Date: 16th Nov, 09:45-10:45 am (EST)

Abstract: Morphing Matter is an interplay of geometry and hidden forces. Lining Yao, the director of Morphing Matter Lab, will share her team's experiences of computing, designing, and fabricating morphing mechanisms that leverage both geometrical and physical knowledge of materials. Lining will unfold a few marriages of geometries and forces in the talk: a conformal map interconnecting beams shrinking and fighting for the lowest entropy, a frustum-shaped groove interfering disks swelling with differential diffusion rate, and a triangulated filler path affecting spacer fabric deforming with biased shear forces. Novel morphing mechanisms and applications also come from these marriages, such as self-assembling furniture, crawling soft robots, and morphing pasta.


 

Award Recipient Speakers

Name

Bianca Falcidieno

National Research Council, Italy.

Bio: Bianca Falcidieno is a former Research Director at the Institute of Applied Mathematics and Information Technologies of the National Research Council of Italy (CNR-IMATI), and she was the chair of the CNR Research Area of Genova (2009-2013). Her research focuses on shape modeling, computer graphics, computational mathematics, and knowledge representation. She has firmly established Genova as an internationally leading research center in these topics, strongly interacting with industrial and social application fields: from industrial design and manufacturing to geographic information systems, from multimedia to cultural heritage. In her career, she coordinated several international projects and the CNR participation to many national research initiatives. As the coordinator of the European project AIM@SHAPE, she pioneered the development of semantics-driven approaches for representing 3D shapes, based on coupling knowledge technologies with geometric representations in this area. She was in charge of various international commitments, including editorial tasks, the organization of several international conferences and workshops as the chair or co-chair, and participation to international program committees. Bianca has also been a gifted mentor, and several of her former students and postdocs have meanwhile become internationally established researchers of their own. Together with Prof. Kunii, she was the co-founder and the editor in chief of the Shape Modeling International Journal and created the Shape Modeling International conference series. Bianca Falcidieno has authored over 250 peer-reviewed scientific publications, her work has been published extensively in the leading journals of the field. For the 80th CNR anniversary, she was included in the 12 top-level female researchers in the history of CNR. Bianca is a Eurographics Fellow, a Pioneer of the Solid Modeling association and in 2019 awarded with the Eurographics Gold Medal for her outstanding scientific contributions to computer graphics and shape modeling.

Shape Modeling: from Geometry to Semantics

Date: 16th Nov, 08:00-08:30 am (EST)

Abstract: Geometric Modeling and Computer Graphics technologies have allowed us to represent and visualize objects and scenes on our digital devices since the 70s. However, during the 90s, the technological evolution of graphical devices and systems, the growth of applications and users, and the complexity of the models brought out the need for a shift of focus: from the modeling of geometries to the description of objects, to highlight aspects of shapes less formalized than geometry.
To meet this need, thanks to the collaboration with Professor Kunii, in the mid-90s, I was able to start a new line of research with him, Shape Modeling. Based on the concept of shape, Shape Modeling is not only related to objects; geometry but also to their structure (object features and part-whole decomposition), meaning in a specific context, and interaction with time. This research aimed to enhance traditional modeling approaches through representations that are closer to our semantic coding of shape perception in both cognitive and creative processes.
In this presentation, I will talk about the beginning and developments of Shape Modeling research and its evolution towards the representation of semantics associated with shapes, including computational topology studies for shape understanding, that I started thanks to Professor Kunii.


 
Name

Mélina Skouras

Inria Grenoble Rhône-Alpes, France

Bio: Mélina Skouras is a permanent researcher in the ANIMA team at Inria Grenoble, France. Until October 2017, she was a postdoctoral associate at MIT where she worked with Prof. Wojciech Matusik on the computational design of meta-materials. She obtained her PhD in 2014 from the Computer Graphics Laboratory of ETH Zurich, Switzerland, where she collaborated with Disney Research Zurich. Her thesis focused on the development of novel algorithms for the design of custom deformable objects. She received her Master's degree in Computer Science and Applied Mathematics from ENSIMAG, INP Grenoble, France, in 2004. Before starting her PhD, she was a software developer at Dassault Systèmes, in the CATIA Geometric Modeler team.

On the computational design of deformable objects

Date: 15th Nov, 10:00-10:45 am (EST)

Abstract: Recent technological advances in digital manufacturing enable experts and casual users alike to design and fabricate complex structures with a fine control over their external geometry and internal material distribution. However, designing an object that is truly functional remains a challenging task. This is because, in the real world, the object is subject to physical laws that affect its behavior, e.g. determine its final shape. Therefore, the designer needs to estimate and invert the effects of the physics on the object to obtain a structure that behaves as desired. This is extremely difficult to achieve by hand and explains why this task is often based on a trial-and-error iterative process. In this talk, I will explain how inverse modeling tools can be used to automate the design of custom elastic objects with prescribed target geometries. I will focus on some important challenges that arise when designing such tools and present the principles that we followed to address them when working on concrete applications.


 

SMI 2021 Conference Chairs

Ergun Akleman

Ergun Akleman 📧

Texas A&M University, USA
Stefanie Hahmann

Stefanie Hahmann 📧

University of Grenoble, France
Jorg Peters

Jorg Peters 📧

University of Florida, USA

SMI 2021 Technical Paper Chairs

Silvia Biasotti

Silvia Biasotti 📧

CNR-IMATI, Italy
Yang Liu

Yang Liu 📧

Microsoft Research Asia, China
Bo Zhu

Bo Zhu 📧

Dartmouth College, USA

International Program Committee

Previous conferences

SMI 2020 - virtual conference [proceedings]

SMI 2018 - Lisbon, Portugal [proceedings]

SMI 2016 - Berlin, Germany [proceedings]

SMI 2014 - Sha Tin, Hong Kong [proceedings]

SMI 2012 - College Station, Texas, USA [proceedings]

SMI 2010 - Aix-En Provence, France [proceedings]

SMI 2008 - Stony Brook, NY, USA [proceedings]

SMI 2006 - Matsushima, Japan [proceedings]

SMI 2004 - Genova, Italy [proceedings]

SMI 2002 - Banff, Alberta, Canada [proceedings]

SMI 1999 - Aizuwakamatsu, Japan [proceedings]

SMI 2019 - Vancouver, Canada [proceedings]

SMI 2017 - Berkeley, California [proceedings]

SMI 2015 - Lille, France [proceedings]

SMI 2013 - Bournemouth, UK [proceedings]

SMI 2011 - Herzliya, Israel [proceedings]

SMI 2009 - Beijing, China [proceedings]

SMI 2007 - Lyon, France [proceedings]

SMI 2005 - Cambridge, MA, USA [proceedings]

SMI 2003 - Seoul, Korea [proceedings]

SMI 2001 - Genova, Italy [proceedings]

SMI 1997 - Aizuwakamatsu, Japan [proceedings]

Please feel free to contact us through emails.